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Author: Nathalie Quintane

Nathalie Quintane was born in Paris in 1964 and is the author of over twenty books of experimental poetry and genre-defying prose. She famously wrote a book about a shoe, and ran a parody literary journal in the 1990s with Christophe Tarkos and Stéphane Bérard. In recent years (beginning with TOMATOES in 2009), her work has come to directly address particular political issues, including the plight of refugees in Europe, the gilets jaunes and Nuit debout movements, the Front nationale, and France's colonial legacies. Keenly aware of how aesthetics, language, and politics are related, she critiques political and critical languages and practices her own alternatives. Her style is incisive and droll, using wordplay to make cutting political arguments, and her texts have a light and vital energy that likely comes from her quasi-improvised approach to composition. Quintane is considered one of the major experimental poets of her generation; TOMATOES is only her second book-length work available in English, after Cynthia Hogue and Sylvain Gallais's translation of JOAM DARC (Fence Books/La Presse, 2017).

Joan Darc
Add to Shopping Cart 9781934200711
16 Currently In Stock PAPERBACK $15.00 12/31/2017

Joan Darc

Fence Books/La Presse

Poetry. Translated from the French by Cynthia Hogue and Sylvain Gallais. Scuffing up the surface of history by scuffing up that of language, Nathalie Quintane manages to get at the myth of Joan of Arc from the inside, turning it from myth to immedia...

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Tomatoes + Why Doesn't the Far Left Read Literature?
Add to Shopping Cart 9781734317671
20 Currently In Stock PAPERBACK $18.00 2/1/2022

Tomatoes + Why Doesn't the Far Left Read Literature?

Kenning Editions

Translated by Marty Hiatt. Lauded French poet Nathalie Quintane’s TOMATOES, written at the height of the infamous Tarnac affair, is a book of “integrated critique,” a form a literary non-fiction that prefers anecdote to theory. In TOMATOES, it turns...

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