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~* POETRY MONTH SALE - ALL STARS EDITION*~ 
 
In honor of April, the cruelest month, we thought we'd break out some of our POETRY ALL STARS - here to outshine those spring showers and to get you and your mind right.
 
Guaranteed to chase the rain away,
 all titles are: 
 
25% off all month
w/code STAR 

 
 
The Collected Poems of Chika Sagawa

(Canarium Books, 2015)
By Chika Sagawa, trans. Sawako Nakayasu
 
Winner of the 2016 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. The first comprehensive collection of one of Japan's foremost modernists to appear in English translation, THE COLLECTED POEMS OF CHIKA SAGAWA is an essential book. The project received a grant from the Japan Foundation, and poems from it have appeared in Poetry, Asymptote, Fascicle, and elsewhere.  
 
 

Before Lyricism

(Ugly Duckling Presse, 2017)
By Karen Emmerich (Translator), Eleni Vakalo
 
Winner of the 2018 Best Translated Book Award. Translated from the Greek by Karen Emmerich. BEFORE LYRICISM includes six book-length poems: The Forest (1954), Plant Upbringing (1956), Diary of Age (1958), Description of the Body (1959), The Meaning of the Blind (1962), and Our Way of Being in Danger (1966). Each of these, apart from Plant Upbringing, was published as a separate book, which Vakalo herself designed. (Plant Upbringing was originally included in the volume Wall Painting, of which Vakalo later repudiated all but this single long poem.) For Vakalo, these poems formed a larger, accretive whole, which she titled Prin Apo Ton Lyrismo (Before Lyricism). By bringing these poems together under a single cover, BEFORE LYRICISM allows us to see the complex web of intertextual relations that bind these books together. Meanwhile, by bringing these poems into English, this volume will enrich not only our knowledge of this key period in Vakalo's career, but English-language readers' understanding of modern Greek poetry as a whole.  
 
 

Some Beheadings

(Nightboat Books, 2017)
By Aditi Machado
 
Winner of the 2017 Believer Poetry Award. A stunning debut collection that examines the geophilosophy of lyric poetry. Here the "beheaded" poet displaces her mind into the landscape, exploring territories as disparate as India's Western Ghats and the cinematic Mojave Desert, as absurd as insomnia and dream. SOME BEHEADINGS asks three questions: "How does thinking happen?" "What does thinking feel like?" "How do I think about the future?" The second question takes primacy over the others, reflecting on what poets and critics have called "the sensuous intellect," what needs to be felt in language, the contours of questions touched in sound and syntax.

 

The Performance of Becoming Human

(Brooklyn Arts Press, 2016)
By Daniel Borzutzky
 
2016 National Book Award Winner. Following in the path of his acclaimed collections THE BOOK OF INTERFERING BODIES (Nightboat, 2011) and IN THE MURMURS OF THE ROTTEN CARCASS ECONOMY (Nightboat, 2015), Daniel Borzutzky returns to confront the various ways nation-states and their bureaucracies absorb and destroy communities and economies. In THE PERFORMANCE OF BECOMING HUMAN, the bay of Valparaiso merges into the western shore of Lake Michigan, where Borzutzky continues his poetic investigation into the political and economic violence shared by Chicago and Chile, two places integral to his personal formation. To become human is to navigate borders, including the fuzzy borders of institutions, the economies of privatization, overdevelopment, and underdevelopment, under which humans endure state-sanctioned and systemic abuses in cities, villages, deserts. Borzutzky, whose writing Eileen Myles has described as "violent, perverse, and tender" in its portrayal of a "kaleidoscopic journey of American horror and global horror," adds another chapter to a growing and important compendium of work that asks what it means to a be both a unitedstatesian and a globalized subject whose body is "shared between the earth, the state, and the bank."

 

IRL

(Birds, LLC, 2016)
By Tommy Pico
 
   Winner of the Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize. IRL is a sweaty, summertime poem composed like a long text message, rooted in the epic tradition of A.R. Ammons, ancient Kumeyaay Bird Songs, and Beyoncé's visual albums. It follows Teebs, a reservation-born, queer NDN weirdo, trying to figure out his impulses/desires/history in the midst of Brooklyn rooftops, privacy in the age of the Internet, street harassment, suicide, boys boys boys, literature, colonialism, religion, leaving one's 20s, and a love/hate relationship with English. He's plagued by an indecision, unsure of which obsessions, attractions, and impulses are essentially his, and which are the result of Christian conversion, hetero-patriarchal/colonialist white supremacy, homophobia, Bacardi, gummy candy, and not getting laid.

IRL asks, what happens to a modern, queer indigenous person a few generations after his ancestors were alienated from their language, their religion, and their history? Teebs feels compelled towards "boys, burgers, booze," though he begins to suspect there is perhaps a more ancient goddess calling to him behind art, behind music, behind poetry.


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