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Our June review highlights are here to help you find a summer read. Below you'll find reviews from Kirkus, Chicago Review of Books, Heavy Feather, and more. To view previous review highlights, click this link to check out our archives.





About Spirits and Other Mysteries/Sobre espíritus y otros misterios Esther Díaz Llanillo, Translated by Dr. Manuel Martínez | Cubanabooks

"There are ample cliffhangers, last-minute twists to disarm the reader, and multiple bleak endings...An intriguing, chilling collection that demands introspection from its readers."

   — Kirkus Reviews

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Scherzos Benjyosos by Keston Sutherland | The Last Books
"Scherzos Benjyosos’s sublime love poetry is seared with intractable kinds of pain for losses both real and symbolic...[it] lets us hear near-death, again, and more, as reverberations of love and pain that do not need us to survive and to transmute wildly.
     Connie Scozzaro, Chicago Review

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Jerks by Sara Lippmann | Mason Jar Press
"In Jerks, Sara Lippmann has crafted a very naturalistic depiction of middle-class, middle of suburbia, middle-aged life...You probably won’t love these characters, but you will see yourself in them, and in that reflection we can see the things about ourselves that are unlikable."

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Returning the Sword to the Stone by Mark Leidner | Fonograf Editions
"These poems swerve and backtrack in wild, often uproarious procedures, and it’s a testament to Leidner that he’s able to perform them in such a way that they don’t become self-indulgent. He tiptoes a line between joyful goofiness and stunning lyricism."
   — Nathan Hoks, Hong Kong Review of Books

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Telephone: Essays in Two Voices by Brenda Miller and Julie Marie Wade | Cleveland State University Poetry Center
“Through that practice of closely listening to the thing the other wrote, they start to approach each other as we go deeper. This effect is amplified because as I have to give up on trying to figure out who’s memory is whose, so both Is contain both of their memories. The I isn’t collapsed, but it is expanded.
   — 
Ander Monson, Essay Daily

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